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Three Cutting-Edge Devices for Pet Health

Three Cutting-Edge Devices for Pet Health
Just as human healthcare is increasingly turning to new technologies and innovative designs, so veterinary medicine is following suit. (Credit: Kevin Cheng)

Just as human healthcare is increasingly turning to new technologies and innovative designs to keep patients alive longer, so veterinary medicine is following suit.

Here are three innovative devices currently being used to help pet owners and professionals care for pets at home and in surgery:

1/ Invoxia’s Smart Dog Collar

This connected dog collar uses embedded artificial intelligence (AI) and sensor technology to measure resting heart and respiratory rate continuously and non-invasively.

Employing LTE-M technology and with a preinstalled SIM card, it works through very thick fur and can also be used as a tracker to follow their outings while they are not with you and to help find them if they run away or get lost.

Not only can vets and owners use data from the Invoxia collar to monitor daily habits and activity levels, including walking, running, eating, resting and barking, but heart and respiratory rates are the best measures for preventive care and monitoring of at-risk dogs.

(Credit: Invoxia)
(Credit: Invoxia)

A higher-than-average resting respiratory rate is one of the best indicators of impending heart failure. A recent study of 40 dogs of various breeds, ages, and sizes confirmed the accuracy of the Smart Dog Collar as a medical-grade tool for monitoring vital signs and detecting early signs of illness. It could also be ideal for monitoring the respiratory rate of brachycephalic dogs.

(Credit: Invoxia)
(Credit: Invoxia)

These breeds with flat faces often struggle to breathe and can suffer digestive issues, eye disease and spinal malformation. They can also suffer from heat intolerance and are at an increased risk of developing heat-related illnesses.

2/ The Hyperbaric Oxygen Chamber for Pets

Vitality 4 Life’s hyperbaric oxygen chamber has been designed to assist in the treatment and healing process of certain acute conditions and diseases in animals. Available as a soft or hard chamber, it increases air pressure so the pet inside takes in more oxygen, helping the body to heal and fight some infections.

The chamber is designed to help reduce tissue swelling and inflammation and lower the pain levels associated with these conditions in pets.

Early use is also said to greatly improve the prognosis for many acute conditions and injuries and decrease the likelihood of becoming chronic problems. These include wounds, burns, smoke inhalation and peritonitis, as well as osteomyelitis and neuropathies. 

The chamber is also believed to be effective in the treatment of gastric dilatation and volvulus, a life-threatening disorder, where the stomach fills with gas, most commonly seen in large, deep-chested dogs.

Surgical procedures, including fracture repair, amputations, skin grafts, hemilaminectomy and ear canal ablation may also benefit.

3/ Mella Pet Care Smart Thermometer

This is a smartphone-enabled, AI-assisted non-rectal thermometer that employs fast axillary temperature measurement, which is non-invasive. An accurate temperature measurement is essential in the treatment and diagnosis of many pet diseases and conditions. 

Traditional thermometers that require rectal insertion can induce fear in animals and many non-contact infrared devices do not always provide accurate results due to animal fur. 

(Credit: Mella Pet Care)
(Credit: Mella Pet Care)

Replacing a rectal thermometer, the Mella Pet Care intelligent device is placed under the foreleg or hindleg of a dog or cat, takes the body temperature and displays the result within approximately 10 to 15 seconds. The data is automatically recorded and can also be sent to the veterinary practice management system.

Using cutting-edge sensor technology it creates a composite reading that is said to surpass a conventional thermometer’s single sensor. Two sensors are located in the axillary probe attachment and the third sensor near the bottom of the base senses ambient room temperature.  

It works seamlessly with global patient management systems, such as Covetrus, and pairs with mobile devices and smartwatches through an app. 

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